After NA: Balochistan plans to pass a bill to ban corporal punishment in schools

The education department had already imposed ban on corporal punishment through a notification

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After NA: Balochistan plans to pass a bill to ban corporal punishment in schools

Education Desk: 

Balochistan has planned to pass a bill from the assembly to ban corporal punishment in all schools across the province. The bill will set out penalties for persons physically punishing children, Sher Khan Bazai, the Secretary Education Balochistan said. The department would submit recommendations to the government in this regard, he mentioned.

This move has come on the part of the provincial government after the National Assembly passed a bill banning corporal punishment in educational institutions.

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“We are not sure about the time-frame for the tabling of the bill”

“We are not sure about the time-frame for the tabling of the bill”, Mr. Bazai said. He mentioned that it is under consideration to turn the earlier notification into an act/bill to ban corporal punishment in schools. For this purpose, the education department would consult all concerned experts, he mentioned.

In February 2010, the Balochistan education department had imposed a ban on corporal punishment through a notification. The then government had directed all district education officers, principals of schools, and teachers to ensure implementation of the notification.

Students at a school that was made functional by Kaka Shaheed foundation in Gulistan: Photo provided by Ghani Kakar

The government already imposed a ban on corporal punishment 

“The government has already imposed but now we would try to pass a bill”, Mr. Bazai mentioned. He said physically punishing children was immoral and it results in discouraging children from studies.

In the NA, the ICT Prohibition of Corporal Punishment Bill effectively bans all forms of corporal punishment “however light” at the workplace, in all types of educational institutions including formal, informal, and religious — both public and private, in child care institutions including foster care, rehabilitation centers, and any other alternative care settings.

The child rights movement welcomes the bill 

Child rights movements have welcomed the passage of the bill and termed it a positive stride. They termed the bill a practical move to stop violence against children in educational institutions. “This is an encouraging step”, Wadood Tareen, the chief executive of an NGO SEHER organization commented.

He however said the legislators had better done it earlier.

After NA: Balochistan plans to pass a bill to ban corporal punishment in schools

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